LYR-210 ON CLINICAL PATH FOR CRS

Lyra has announced positive results for its LANTERN Phase 2 randomized controlled study of LYR-210 (remove link – no link on any text) for the treatment of CRS. Highlights:

  • First therapy to demonstrate efficacy results in both non-polyp and polyp patients, based on 100% achieving SNOT-22 MCID at week 24 from a single in-office administration (7500 µg).
  • Achieved statistically significant improvement across 3 cardinal symptoms (nasal blockage, nasal discharge and facial pain) at week 24 (7500 µg).  These are the most prevalent cardinal symptoms for surgically naïve CRS patients both with and without nasal polyps.
  • Decreased ethmoid opacification at week 24, as measured by improvement in bilateral ethmoid Zinreich scores, an objective measurement of ethmoid sinus opacification (7500 µg).
  • Reduced the need for rescue treatment (7500 µg).

See video presentation of LANTERN LYR-210 Phase 2 study results and link to slides under Presentations, below.

  • CRS is a chronic, lifelong condition, and there continues to be a need for innovation for the millions of people suffering from this inflammatory disease.  As such, the LANTERN results are very encouraging, particularly as there are no FDA approved therapeutics for CRS patients without nasal polyps, despite that patient population representing approximately 70-90% of all CRS patients.

    Robert Kern, MD
    Chief Medical Officer, Lyra
    George A. Sisson Professor and Chair, Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

  • The LANTERN study results are very exciting to those of us in the ENT community who are eager to embrace new treatment options for CRS, including alternatives to surgery.  Based on my experience in Lyra’s Phase 1 and Phase 2 studies for LYR-210, I believe a drug-releasing nasal implant that may offer up to six months treatment would represent an important innovation for CRS patients.

    Joanne Rimmer, MD
    LANTERN study investigator
    ENT surgeon and rhinologist, Monash Health
    Associate Professor, Monash University

  • I believe this innovative long-acting investigational treatment has the potential to make a meaningful positive impact on patients’ quality of life and offer an appealing alternative to invasive medical procedures.

    Robert Kern, MD
    Chief Medical Officer, Lyra
    George A. Sisson Professor and Chair, Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

  • The in-office procedure of placing LYR-210 into a patient’s nose is straightforward, suggesting that LYR-210 may have the potential to improve the quality of life for patients who have failed medical management while offering an alternative to invasive medical procedures.

    Joanne Rimmer, MD
    LANTERN study investigator
    ENT surgeon and rhinologist, Monash Health
    Associate Professor, Monash University

Presentations

Combined Otolaryngology Spring Meetings: COSM 2021 – April 2021

Long-acting implantable corticosteroid matrix for chronic rhinosinusitis: Results of LANTERN Phase 2 randomized controlled study

Posters

American Rhinologic Society Annual Meeting – September 2020

A novel continuous topical steroid implant (LYR-210) reduces sinonasal type 2 inflammation and rhinologic symptoms in chronic rhinosinusitis

Continuous steroid delivery by LYR-210 improves symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis

A drug release and pharmacokinetic evaluation of novel mometasone furoate eluting matrices

Publications

Douglas RG, Psaltis AJ, Rimmer J, Kuruvilla T, Cervin A, and Kuang Y. Phase 1 clinical study to assess the safety of a novel drug delivery system providing long-term topical steroid therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology, Vol. 9, No. 4, April 2019.

Sharma U, Concagh D, Core L, Kuang Y, You C, Pham Q, Zugates G, Busold R, Webber S, Merlo J, Langer R, Whitesides George M, and Palasis M. The development of bioresorbable composite polymeric implants with high mechanical strength. Nature Materials, 17: 96-103, 2017.

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